Long-Tailed Tit

Long-tailed Tit

Aegithalos caudatus

The European population, of this bird, is regarded as Secure by BirdLife International.

Size: 13cm-15cm

Weight: 8-10 grams

Habitat: woodlands, gardens and parks.

Nesting: a compact ball of moss and spider webs, lined with feathers and covered with lichen, usually in thorny vegetation. Entrance is near the top.

Eggs: 9-8 white eggs with a few spots.

Food: insects, insect larvae and eggs.  Readily feed on peanut cakes and Peanut Butter for Birds, particularly if sited closed to cover, or if the food is rubbed into bark or a similar rough service to make a “feeding stripe”.  Often seen on kibbled sunflower hearts and may also use peanut feeders, nibbling off small chunks of nut.

Call: bubbling or rippling “zeee” calls and sudden “zee –zee-zee” contact notes are usually the first hint that a flock is passing through.

Characteristics: Long-tailed Tits are tiny birds, not much larger than a Wren but with very long tails.  They are one of the first birds to start nest building, often before the leaves have unfurled on the hedges, which may explain why the nest is so well camouflaged.  If a breeding attempt fails the birds will split up and seek out a closely related pair to help at the nest.

Outside the breeding season the birds form flocks of related birds, sometimes 20 or 30 strong.  These flocks will sometimes be joined by birds such as Treecreepers, Goldcrests or Nuthatches, presumably benefitting from the vigilance of so many pairs of eyes all looking out for danger.  Long-tailed Tits are very sociable and constantly call to keep the flock together.  They also roost together and, on cold nights, will form a dense huddle to keep each other warm.

 

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By proceeding to navigate through the shop, this will be considered as consent to the use of cookies. View Privacy Policy